Various More Than One

The short answer is yes — a company can typically register more than one DBA in the same state. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. SCCs can attach themselves to local lymph nodes and spread. I was checking this site for something to help explain this construction to a student who has serious problems with core grammar. Are you ready to start a businessform Various More Than One LLC, or reorganize your current business structure with a Various More Than One DBA or other business incorporation services?

Left untreated completely, they can eat through muscle, even bone, and that can make surgery more difficult and more disfiguring. SCCs can attach themselves to local lymph nodes and spread. First and foremost, Dr. Hale tells her patients to wear a broad-spectrum, high-SPF sunscreen every day, rain or shine, all year round. To help motivate people, she often cites three important studies that came out of Australia. For 20 years, the researchers followed adults who went from just recreational sunscreen use to everyday sunscreen use.

They found that regular sunscreen use reduced squamous cell carcinoma by 40 percent and helped prevent actinic keratoses, too. Is would be impossible. There are more men than just John in the room. There is more than one man in the room. But that phrase could not explain singular is in this sentence: More than one man is still in the house. But then this phenomenon should not occur if the verb came before the subject: Not only has more than one man been seen near the power plant, but Cerberus Cerberus The reason for the discontinuity is that There Insertion applies, and it's not only idiomatic, it has very odd restrictions.

John: Then how about this example mentioned in my answer : More than one man is still in the house. There is no there , but is is still singular. That's because phrases like more than one man agree with a singular verb.

And it stays singular after There Insertion. Which reinforces the freezing of there's as the canonical contraction when be is the verb following there. There are, however, several hundred other verbs it applies to, as Levin points out.

John: I do not disagree; but then which discontinuity did you mean? I'm not sure I understand your point. I think I disagree with your sentence analysis: I think the subject of "There is more than one man in the room" is "man".

Looked at this way, the singular "is" is totally unremarkable. There are more than one species 'One species' is actually singular: 'species' is both the singular and the plural form of the word, the nature of the sentence dictating which it is at a given time.

It should be: There is more than one species Now, if you were speaking of twelve species you would say: There are more than twelve species because 'species' is a plural here, as the preceding 'twelve' signifies. Here is a clearer example: There is more than one knife in the kitchen.

There are more than six knives in the kitchen. I believe your confusion stems from the term species not changing form when it becomes a plural. I think you're missing my focus. It's true I chose "species" in my example because it's the same form in singular and plural I didn't want my choice of plurality there to affect other's assessment of acceptability. But you address only contexts where the speaker knows how many there are or is, if he knows there's only one.

In which case the verb form is obvious, as you say. I'm asking about cases where it's unknown whether there's one or more there are one or more? I'll edit the question to clarify this. This isn't even close.

I agree with your conclusion that there is more than one species is correct; but I contend that subject and verb in fact do not agree here, which is what makes it an idiomatic expression. If it weren't idiomatic, the verb would agree with more in all cases, which is plural: there are more would be the core of the sentence. I have investigated this problem a bit further in my answer below. The American Heritage Book of English Usage states: When a noun phrase contains more than one and a singular noun, the verb is normally singular So your intuition is pretty good.

Hydrangea Hydrangea 2 2 gold badges 6 6 silver badges 11 11 bronze badges. Would you like to guess whether "species of cat" is singular or plural in my example? It was a slightly disingenuous choice of noun phrase, I admit.

But that was just to force readers here to be uncertain about the applicability of logic such as you quote. Learn More about multiple. Resources for multiple Time Traveler! Explore the year a word first appeared. Dictionary Entries near multiple multiplant multiplatinum multiplayer multiple multiple allele multiple-alphabet cipher multiple birth.

Phrases Related to multiple multiple birth. Time Traveler for multiple The first known use of multiple was in See more words from the same year.

Financial Definition of multiple. What It Is A multiple is a relative valuation metric used to estimate the value of a stock. How It Works Let's look at an example to illustrate the concept.

Comments on multiple What made you want to look up multiple? Get Word of the Day daily email! Test Your Vocabulary. Love words? Bernstein's The Careful Writer both address the topic. Bremner sees more than as an adverbial phrase modifying the adjective one , "which is singular and therefore qualifies a singular noun, which takes a singular verb.

Bernstein doesn't try to justify More than one person was involved as good grammar—just "good idiom. All but one ship was sunk is another example of "good idiom. Ben has written for Fortune companies, the Governor of Iowa who now serves as U.

Secretary of Agriculture , the U. Secretary of the Navy, and many corporate clients. He writes about entrepreneurship, technology, food and other areas of great personal interest. Latest posts by Ben Gran see all. So You Moved? Start Your Business.

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See more words from the same year. More Definitions for multiple. A multiple is a relative valuation metric used to estimate the value of a stock. This number -- "7" -- is known as a multiple. By applying the average industry multiple to Big Store's earnings per share EPS , you can estimate the price Big Store "should" be trading at a higher price.

Here's the calculation:. Investors use multiples to gain some insight into whether a company's stock price is too high or too low. Multiples are quick, but limited tools for stock analysis. Unfortunately, most of the useful details are in the financial statements.

For example, Big Store may trade at a lower multiple relative to its peers because it isn't growing as fast. Or perhaps its management team is not as effective. If you only use the earnings multiple to estimate the stock's intrinsic value , you're working without The bottom line is that multiples can be complementary tools in your financial toolbox. However, they should never be the only tools you use.

Source: Investing Answers. See the full definition for multiple in the English Language Learners Dictionary. Bremner's Words on Words and Theodore M.

Bernstein's The Careful Writer both address the topic. Bremner sees more than as an adverbial phrase modifying the adjective one , "which is singular and therefore qualifies a singular noun, which takes a singular verb. Bernstein doesn't try to justify More than one person was involved as good grammar—just "good idiom. All but one ship was sunk is another example of "good idiom. Quotated, that gets 20M Google hits , as opposed to M for "is" , and M for "are".

I may be in a linguistic minority, but at least I don't feel totally alone! This chart may show be isn't or at least wasn't perhaps as unusual as some may think The verb should follow the number of the noun.

If you use one then you have already picked your number. So if you say. I was checking this site for something to help explain this construction to a student who has serious problems with core grammar. While the consensus here, that this is an idiomatic construction, is probably correct, I tried to come up with an answer that I could use in this case, and am posting it here for others to comment on--or use if it's helpful:.

The "more than one" construction is analogous to an "or" in the subject. Take, say, "more than one person is coming. This is probably no more than a post facto attempt to impose a logic on an idiom, but does it work? In this kind of tricky situations, what I generally do is go to some established publication that I know mostly publishes correct English.

For instance BBC. I would say, you can use "are" if the following part is plural. For instance:. You could verify this on BBC: just search this "there are more than one" site:bbc. Also, if you use is then it would give you "more than one person, more than one twitter account, etc. As others have explained, it should be "is", as in "There is more than one knife in the kitchen" to use the example used in another answer.

I think the inclination to write "are" instead of "is" stems from a subconscious perception that "more than one" would be grammatically interchangeable with e. But, as can easily be seen by writing the whole sentence out, it isn't: "There are three knife in the kitchen".

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What's the difference? Ask Question. Asked 8 years, 3 months ago. Active 3 months ago. Viewed k times. There is more than one way to skin a cat. If there are more than one species of cat, we will flay each species differently.

FumbleFingers FumbleFingers k 37 37 gold badges silver badges bronze badges. Just a note: Personally, if I had to choose by heart, I'd say " There is more than one Alenanno: With no other context I agree "is" probably has to be the default.

But as Wanda points out, if you know how many , you probably want the verb to agree with reality. And as I'm asking, what if you don't know, and wish to call attention to that? At least one grammar forum out there has discussed the cat-skinning example with a conclusion that agrees with Wanda and Hydrangea below: use "there is more than one" because "is" goes with "one", whether it's one book, one species, one way There are plenty of results for "are more than one [thing]", though usually less than the "is" version, so perhaps some speakers don't follow this rule.

Which I very specifically don't , and it's in that context I'm looking for help with the phrase. Coming to this a bit late, but it seems simple enough to me: the verb must agree with the noun, and the noun is "way", i.

But why does this at all surprise us? Consider the following sentence: There are more men in the room. About Latest Posts. Ben Gran is a freelance writer from Des Moines, Iowa. Ben has written for Fortune companies, the Governor of Iowa who now serves as U. Secretary of Agriculture , the U. Secretary of the Navy, and many corporate clients. He writes about entrepreneurship, technology, food and other areas of great personal interest.

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