Yoshi Wada Earth Horns With Electronic Drone

Per Larsson. Recently he has concerned himself with ever-larger, homemade "pipe horns," as he calls them, and last Sunday evening at the Kitchen, 59 Wooster Street, he presented the second of two concerts showing his latest work. Earth Horns with Electronic Drone Part 1 Nick Barber. Chris Guilfoyle. Wada more than 20 feet long, the fattest 10 inches in its interior diameter. Its streamlined design and notions toward infinite real time and space Yoshi Wada Earth Horns With Electronic Drone Earth Horns mantra and ceremonial qualities.

In the last year, Em and Omega Point, falling into the latter category of archivists, have been busy reintroducing the world to the works of Japanese artist by way of New York Yoshi Wada. Wada is an inventor as well, having constructed massive sound installations, homemade bagpipes, and, in the case of Earth Horns and Electronic Drone , four massive 10 to foot-long horns built from common plumbing materials. The horns are tuned to the naturally occurring frequencies of the room, and the electronic drone — sensitive to these instruments' subtle, wavering tones — responds accordingly to the room in real time, creating an endless interplay of sound that reflects on itself.

Although methodically planned out, the result is something quite visceral and less scientific than its process would indicate. Although at first glance a monolithic work, the nature of the instruments interacting with each other and with the space in real time lends itself to a much more linear action — and this is exactly why the music takes such a great amount of time to absorb. Often sounding like slowed, melting monk chants, the perseverance of each player involved in this performance is indispensable.

Required to repeatedly perform a small task at such great lengths is a tall order, with all the performers working towards something homogenous rather than striving for individuality. Universal Default. Kate Brown. Wyndham Rain. Wilfried Spaar. Randall Sokoloff. Barry Moffatt.

Daniel Kettle. Purchasable with gift card. Earth Horns with Electronic Drone Part 1 Earth Horns with Electronic Drone Part 2 Earth Horns with Electronic Drone Part 3 Earth Horns with Electronic Drone original program notes "The electronics is an open system that processes and stores information about real-time acoustic activity, and recycles it back into the acoustic environment where it becomes a part of a further tone cycle which is again fed into the system and back into the acoustic space…etc.

Seven electronic tones, tuned harmonics of the line cycle, are independently generated. Because the sounds are harmonics of overtones of each other, all changes become modulations of a single resonating acoustic environment. Each of the tones can be varied independently or in their combination in an open system. The electronic system is always sensitive to real time activity as well as summing and deriving changes from Pipehorn loudness and duration.

Here the electronic controls that add, subtract and multiply are derived directly from changes in Pipehorn loudness, duration and interaction. People can hear this sound of subtle movement, the interacting of electronic sound and Pipehorn sound.

This creates a dynamic sound environment. These instruments, musically, have a precise pitch, and can generate these pure electronic sounds, as well, which are unique to this situation. I am most interested in the effect, psychologically, of these subtle tones and movements on both players and audience alike, particularly played, as I plan, over an extended period of time. Recently he has concerned himself with ever-larger, homemade "pipe horns," as he calls them, and last Sunday evening at the Kitchen, 59 Wooster Street, he presented the second of two concerts showing his latest work.

Wada more than 20 feet long, the fattest 10 inches in its interior diameter. Wada, Garrett List, Rhys Chatham and Barbara Stewart blew the horns more or less steadily for nearly two hours, producing deep, resonant sounds separated mostly at the intervals of the fifth and octave, although there was some appealing microtonal drifting, too. There was also an electronic setup under Liz Phillips's direction that generated fixed synthesized tones triggered by what the live players did.

Tags experimental New York. Lament for the Rise and Fall of the Elephantine Crocodile. Earth Horns with Electronic Drone. Per Larsson go to album.

Its streamlined design and notions toward infinite real time and space give Earth Horns mantra and ceremonial qualities.

The notion of music requiring such attentive listening is more valuable to our society now than ever before. As attractive as all this is, Earth Horns' falls slightly short of Wada's other recently unveiled archives, primarily Lament for the Rise and Fall of the Elephantine Crocodile -- though it's not the performance but the recording itself that dissapoints.

Initially, it sounds as if Earth Horns is mastered at a volume far too low, but the reason for this quickly becomes apparent when loud, intrusive audience coughs and footsteps enter into the mix. These effects are easy enough to tune out, but this remains a mid-fi room recording at best, and not without its imperfections. The uninitiated would do best by starting out with the aforementioned Elephantine Crocodile or Off the Wall , but for those generally swayed by drone and early minimalism, Earth Horns and Electric Drone is an essential piece of music history.

With DeLorean , we aim to rediscover overlooked artists and genres, to listen to music historically and contextually, to underscore the fluidity of music. Clair de brume. Chris Videll. William Selman.

Chris Guilfoyle. Universal Default. Kate Brown. Wyndham Rain. Wilfried Spaar. Randall Sokoloff. Barry Moffatt. Daniel Kettle. Purchasable with gift card. Earth Horns with Electronic Drone Part 1 Earth Horns with Electronic Drone Part 2 Earth Horns with Electronic Drone Part 3 Earth Horns with Electronic Drone original program notes "The electronics is an open system that processes and stores information about real-time acoustic activity, and recycles it back into the acoustic environment where it becomes a part of a further tone cycle which is again fed into the system and back into the acoustic space…etc.

Seven electronic tones, tuned harmonics of the line cycle, are independently generated. Because the sounds are harmonics of overtones of each other, all changes become modulations of a single resonating acoustic environment. Each of the tones can be varied independently or in their combination in an open system. The electronic system is always sensitive to real time activity as well as summing and deriving changes from Pipehorn loudness and duration.

Here the electronic controls that add, subtract and multiply are derived directly from changes in Pipehorn loudness, duration and interaction. People can hear this sound of subtle movement, the interacting of electronic sound and Pipehorn sound. This creates a dynamic sound environment. These instruments, musically, have a precise pitch, and can generate these pure electronic sounds, as well, which are unique to this situation.

I am most interested in the effect, psychologically, of these subtle tones and movements on both players and audience alike, particularly played, as I plan, over an extended period of time. Recently he has concerned himself with ever-larger, homemade "pipe horns," as he calls them, and last Sunday evening at the Kitchen, 59 Wooster Street, he presented the second of two concerts showing his latest work.

Wada more than 20 feet long, the fattest 10 inches in its interior diameter. Wada, Garrett List, Rhys Chatham and Barbara Stewart blew the horns more or less steadily for nearly two hours, producing deep, resonant sounds separated mostly at the intervals of the fifth and octave, although there was some appealing microtonal drifting, too.

There was also an electronic setup under Liz Phillips's direction that generated fixed synthesized tones triggered by what the live players did.